Archives For Politics

A Slow Turn To Starboard

February 18, 2016 — 2 Comments

Clouds

The cannon

                         is just out of range.

Each thunderous estimate hits the waves,

            vibrating thuds pound through each nerve.

Rushing anticipation fills quick responses,

veins full of anxiety, function on the fumes of exhausted expectations,

to out run,

to out bid,

to out smart,

the great descending grey.

Too busy to breathe,

                       too

                       tired

                       to argue.

Answers to this loud inquisition are setting up to prove

the illegitimacy of their own walls of certainty.

Their models

                  never suggested a night

        of waves and squalls.

Unceasing in their quest,

         unanswered by the answer they want to hear.

Refusing to pull into the safe port long held sure by ancient seafarers,

  veiled reason is employed to ignore reason.

Its existence rejected,

                              recycled as intellectual fodder,

                              for far superior moderns.

Faith,

   that jarring inconvenience,

           is bound and silenced.

The self-evident truth still confronting their understanding is thrown overboard.

The old answer, once spoken authoritatively before them,

                                                                               sinks;

a metaphor for the shattering conclusions

soon to be witnessed from shore.

Their rest,

a slow turn to starboard,

yet,

the ship steams on, its Captains shouting

“there is no need for a safe port of call”.


RL2016

On That Day

August 12, 2015 — Leave a comment

Fall Out Filtered RL2015

When, on that solemn day,
the remnants of Western civilisation gather
to count the cost,
they will remember
that it was the Left who fired the first shot.

 

 

 


(RL2015)

The information revolution may one day be described as the age of politics, power and propaganda.

It’s good to know the differences and to act justly on them.

 ‘Do not become slaves of men [or women].’
– (Paul, 1 Corinthians 7:22-23, ESV)

 

ThoughtsonSocialMedia_blogpostMay1st2015

ANZAC

April 25, 2015 — 2 Comments

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Orchestrated by socio-political heavy weights such as Lord Kitchener, and younger politicians like Winston Churchill. Commonwealth soldiers landed in the beach assault on Gallipoli and other areas of the peninsula, in April, 1915. These included soldiers from Britain, India, Australia and New Zealand.

Though debate still continues, The Dardanelles Strait campaign ended in more of a stalemate than defeat.

It was ultimately deemed a failure, due, according to Lloyd George, ‘not so much [the younger] Winston Churchill’s haste as to Lord Kitchener’s and [the then British Prime Minister] Herbert Asquith’s procrastination.’ [i]

Among other things, the joint Australian and New Zealand commemoration of ANZAC day provides an opportunity to reflect on the cost of war, freedom and the importance of our gratitude; that our collective “thank you” is collectively acknowledged; lived and breathed, not just superficially spoken.

Just as importantly, the day also provides an opportunity to talk about the violent persecution of the Armenians; a persecution carried out by some of the louder political factions within the politically unstable Ottoman Empire during this period.

The Armenians were Christians. They were considered more Westernised than their Muslim neighbours and as a result were looked upon with suspicion by the hostile factions.

The Armenian people looked for independence from Turkey, but were yet to be represented by any organised governmental body.

This was unlike Turkey, Australia and New Zealand, who, being represented as a nation in the battle for the Gallipoli Peninsula, had been considered to have come of age .

Alan Moorehead rightly noted that the success of the Turkish Army had become a political success.

‘They saw themselves as standing for the Turk, and for Islam. So, in elation, they set about hunting down their racial and political opponents (which was nothing new in the East or everywhere else for that matter). Success against the allied assault had expedited the persecution and slaughter of Armenians. It would be absurd, however, to argue that the Allies’ failure in the Dardanelles was the only cause of this, since the root instinct to destroy the unprotected, Christian, Armenian minority was always there. Before March there were about two million Armenians in Turkey, and it was the young Turks’ intention to exterminate or deport them all. This task, however, was never completed; barely three-quarters of a million were dead or dying by the time the frantic rage of their tormentors had exhausted itself.’

The point of ANZAC day is first found in an ode near to its heart:

‘…At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.’
(The Ode, from For The Fallen, Robert Laurence Binyon, 1869-1943 )

We are in need of ANZAC day. Though body and memory fade, the act of being remembered transcends time. Placing us in the humble position of being reminded that ‘we are not God. That we aren’t even good idols.’ [iii]

Because of the gravity of it, our corporate, individual and collective arrogance is challenged; And we are met face to face with the enormity of the task before us. A task of vigilance that requires us to make every effort to protect and seek, peace and good will, among societies and nations.

Standing with those who care to uphold it, and are willing to share in bearing both its burdens and its blessings.

Standing in responsible disagreement against those who would seek to do the opposite.

Perhaps at the core of how important ANZAC day is, is that we as a society, are ourselves, confronted with the brutal fact, that a history too easily forgotten is a history too easily repeated.

 


Source:

[i] Moorehead, A. 1956, The Classic Account of Gallipoli, Aurum Press LTD. (p.171)

[ii] ibid, pp.98-101

[iii] Niebuhr, R. 1945 ‘Today, Tomorrow & The Eternal’ in Discerning the Signs of the Times :Sermon Essays

Related posts:

100 Years

The image in the photo above is of some knitted, red, poppy flowers. They mark the 100th anniversary of the ANZAC landings and were on display at a local show a few weeks back.

 

If there was room in the title I would add, ‘selective outrage’ and ‘selective hearing’ to this list. I also changed the words ‘ownership of’ to ‘claim on’, because I don’t think it fully expresses the truth.

I was, perhaps, being a little too pessimistic when I posted that to my FB wall.

Certain elements claim it, but ownership is, thankfully, not yet a complete reality.

It’s no big secret that I’m a huge fan of the late J.B.E – here is yet another reason why:

‘…For those of us who entered young adulthood in the 1960s, to be an intellectual was to be in opposition. To be an academic was to be on the left, minimally a liberal.
It was unfashionable to suggest that, although the Vietnam War was unjust and needed to be brought to a halt as quickly as possible, communism posed a real threat.
Yet the historic record was clear: In the process of destroying freedom, Communist regimes slaughtered millions of their own people. Although that was an empirical reality, many denied it.
Facts themselves came in for a beating, partly because the country had been lied to on so many occasions that the cynical view arose that no one ever tells the truth in public life, and partly because this period saw the beginning of a rush into the arms of subjectivism.
From the subjectivist perspective, how I feel about something triumphs over serious thinking.’

Source:

Elshtain, J. 2008 Just War Against Terror: The Burden Of American Power In A Violent World (p. 72 & 73)

I can’t be easy without my pen in my hand, yet I know not what to write.

(John Adams, 1774 The Letters of John and Abigail Adams (Kindle Ed).