Spring Haiku: Training Up Syllable Warriors

November 19, 2016 — Leave a comment

gardenia-2016One of the best ways to review how to identify syllables is with the traditional Japanese form of poetry called haiku.

It’s excellent for revision because it encourages students to work with vowels, adjectives, objectivity and themes.The basic principles of haiku writing makes this an excellent teaching tool.

Traditionally, haiku follows a non-rhyming syllable pattern of 5-7-5. This becomes a stanza of only three lines. The sentences tend to follow a theme, but it’s not necessary to have each sentence follow on from the next. As long as the general idea or topic is packaged well enough as a whole.

For our homeshooling haikus it’s been a lot of trial and error. None of that has been a bad thing. These hits and misses only make us work harder at refining our own personal style.

Each of the homeschoolers have a voice, its just a matter of coaching them to speak with it in writing. We’ve been doing these from time to time over the past couple of years and I’ve grown to value of the simple, reflective and calming process.

Our next project, when I can get to it, is to do some more work with Tanka, which is very similar to Haiku, only it allows for more syllables per line and usually contains five lines instead of three.

Tanka seems easier, given the extra room, however, when working with kids, I’ve found it to be harder to work with, than haiku. My hope is that since we’ve become more familiar with Haiku, Tanka will not be as daunting a task as it was our first time around.

Here’s a few I put together the other day. My themes were Spring and homeschool.
.

.

From the storm emerges

the firm grip of sunlight

Clouds break open

.

Dancing petals

Ride waves of air

Wind makes the melody

.

Books swing open

The drowsy meet the dawn

And minds awaken

.


(RL2016)

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