Lifeschooling

July 21, 2015 — 7 Comments

Here I was thinking that my developing ideas about homeschooling, being more like lifeschooling, was an original concept.

I’m not sold on Kirk Cameron’s approach to evangelism or some of his theology. Also, Cameron is sometimes reckless. The portion in this video where he mentions evolution, for instance, all to easily implies that Christian homeschooling families are reactionary.It implies that they tend to retreat from public because of a fear of evolution, an anti-evolutionist position, or a hatred of reason and science.

The tone and point of the video aren’t bad. It just doesn’t help when celebrities hand out sound bites to the wolves, who are all too ready to find, and howl, whip statements out against Christian homeschooling families.

This said, for now, I’m on board with the term lifeschooling. It could be rightly argued that this is just a matter of semantics. However, I think the term works. It might better serve in expressing the grind, loving sacrifice and great adventure that homeschooling is.

7 responses to Lifeschooling

  1. 

    I didn’t get the same impression as you, probably because Cameron was pretty vague about most of what he said.

    I think the only work of his with which I’ve watched and reacted with a cringe is when he attempted to engage in a debate with atheists. While I think he has a good heart and good intentions, apologetics and Christian philosophy does not appear to be his thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • 

      Fair point. Still, with the way the world currently is; its media and its irrational hostility towards Christian act and thought, as a representative, K.C should take more care with his approach. This said, I am a fan of Duck Dynasty and some of the blunt, to-the-point things Phil Robertson has had to say. So, the saying “any publicity is good publicity”, might fit K.C as well?

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      • 

        Well, I’m not sure just “any” publicity is good because, as you well noted, the wolves in media are apt to twist the words of those with whom they are in ideological disagreement. On the other hand, it’s not at all clear why we ought to care what they say. In the end, we won’t stand before the media to be judged. As Dallas Willard noted, we’re ultimately playing to an audience of One.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 

        For sure. Even Jesus, Paul and Peter had their accusers and after making a considerable effort just walked away when their audience turned on them. I think it’s a case of bringing Christian theology into responsible dialogue and critique of ideology in a persuasive way, that doesn’t mean having to compromise theology to do so.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 

        “I think it’s a case of bringing Christian theology into responsible dialogue”

        Well, therein, as they say, lies the rub. Since when are skeptics and enemies of Christian theology “responsible”? I’m sure you’ve tried to engage in dialogue with atheists and skeptics online, right? Any of them behave responsibly? Sure, there may be one in a million who at least try to exhibit some manners, but those appear less often than Halley’s Comet.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 

        🙂 sadly, that is very true.

        Like

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  1. Year in Review: Top Twenty Posts of 2015 « Gratia Veritas Lumen - January 2, 2016

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